Horse power (horsepower), usually the power unit used to determine the forces of automobiles and electric motors. The term was made by James Watt in order to understand the power of these machines by potential buyers in the years when steam engines were being produced.

The Scottish engineer and physicist, James Watt, used the concept of etti Horsepower iş in 1872 in order to enable the customers to compare the capabilities of the steam engines with the existing systems.

Watt predicted that a horse could rotate a mill wheel with a 12 feet radius of 144 times a hour or 2.4 times per minute, and that the force he had applied to the wheel was 180 lbs.

SI equivalents of units here:

1 ft (fit) = 0,3048 m
1 pound = 0,45359237 kg
1 lbf (libre-force) = g × 1 pound = 9,80665 m / s2 × 1 lb × 0,45359237 kg / lb = 4,44822 kg · m / s2 = 4,44822 N
180 lbf (lb-force) = 180 × 4,44822 N = 800,6796 N

Job = Force x Path; Power = Work / Time; Power = (Force x Road) / Time

(or P = τ. =; τ = r × F; τ = rFsinω; P = rFsinθr.F.sin =.θ) (τ: torque, force moment, unit torque, torque = Nm = kg.m2 / s2) ((= angular speed (rad / s)

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